Warning: Javascript must be enabled to use all the features on this page!
Click to hideNews Bulletins

USGS Groundwater Data for Kansas

Click to hide state-specific text

*** The Kansas Water Science Center has transitioned to a new data management software package. While you may not have noticed this transition, some sites may have problems or delays in being updated. We are actively monitoring these conditions and are resolving them as quickly as possible. See the Dec 8 news entry for more information at: https://help.waterdata.usgs.gov/news
Historic (pre-2007) gage-height data may contain erroneous values, such as pressure sensors encased in ice, even if they are flagged as approved. These data are made available to the public, but data users are cautioned to carefully screen the data and contact the USGS Kansas Water Science Center if they have questions or concerns about specific values.

** During winter months the realtime streamflow displayed may not reflect the true discharge for periods when ice forms in the stream. When ice forms, the river cross-section is constricted and produces a higher river stage for any given amount of discharge that exists during ice-free periods. This condition is known as backwater. Although accurate themselves, the river stages can no longer be used to accurately and directly compute discharge from the rating curve (which relates stage to discharge) because the amount of backwater varies with time, temperature, and other factors. More complex procedures that require the use of meteorological and hydrological data from other stations in the area must be used to determine discharge at the affected stations. Unfortunately, these more complex procedures cannot yet be applied in real time. Additional, ice forming in the channel can result in erroneous readings as the instrumentation in the stream is adversely affected by the ice generally resulting in an erroneously higher stage reading. While every attempt is made to screen erroneous data from the realtime display, this data is considered provisional and should be used with caution.


(16 sites)

Current conditions at selected sites based on the most recent data from on-site automated recording equipment. Measurements are commonly recorded at a fixed interval of 15- to 60-minutes and transmitted to the USGS every hour. Values may include "Approved" (quality-assured data that may be published) and/or more recent "Provisional" data (of unverified accuracy and subject to revision). Most current data are provisional.

(29 sites)

The same data accessed by the Current Conditions link above but including both active and discontinued sites with data for any part of the period October 1, 2007, through the present. Values may include "Approved" (quality-assured data that may be published) and/or more recent "Provisional" data (of unverified accuracy and subject to revision).

(61 sites)

Summary of all data for each day for the period of record and may represent the daily mean, median, maximum, minimum, and/or other derived value. Values may include "Approved" (quality-assured data that may be published) and/or more recent "Provisional" data (of unverified accuracy and subject to revision). Example.

Statistics
(15 sites)

Statistics are computed from approved daily mean data at each site. These links provide summaries of approved historical daily values for daily, monthly, and annual (water year or calendar year) time periods.

(27,426 sites)
Manual measurements of depth to water in wells.
Introduction

The USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) contains extensive water data for the nation. Public access to many of these data is provided via the USGS Water Data for the Nation site (additional background).

The Groundwater database consists of more than 850,000 records of wells, springs, test holes, tunnels,drains, and excavations in the United States. Available site descriptive information includes well location information such as latitude and longitude, well depth, and aquifer.
The USGS annually monitors groundwater levels in thousands of wells in the United States. Groundwater level data are collected and stored as either discrete field-water-level measurements or as continuous time-series data from automated recorders. Data from some of the continuous record stations are relayed to USGS offices nationwide through telephone lines or by satellite transmissions providing access to current groundwater data.

Once a complete day of readings are received from a site, daily summary data are generated and made available online. USGS finalizes data at individual sites on a continuous basis as environmental conditions and hydrologic characteristics permit.